17 05, 2022

Top Ten MBA Programs

By |2022-09-11T14:37:07-04:00May 17th, 2022|MBA Admissions, Uncategorized|0 Comments

The TOP TEN MBA Programs for 2022

Getting into  a Top Ten MBA Program in the US Today:

 

Applying for your MBA this year?  Here is an expertly compiled list ranking the best business schools in the U.S., in order, including average GMAT scores, acceptance rate, and number of currently enrolled students.  Read on, and see what it takes to get into the MBA program of your dreams!

1. Harvard University

Harvard Business School (HBS).  Students had a 727 GMAT score (average) + the school had an acceptance rate of 11.5%. HBS currently enrolls 1,593 full-time MBA students.
Harvard Business School

Harvard Business School (HBS) – Top 10 MBA

2. Stanford University

Stanford Graduate School of Business’s average incoming MBA student had a 733 GMAT score with an 8.9% acceptance rate. Stanford currently enrolls 840 students.
Stanford University

Stanford – Top 10 MBA

3. University of Pennsylvania (Wharton)

The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania accepted MBA applicants had a 722 GMAT score with a 27% acceptance rate.  The school currently enrolls 915 full-time MBA students.
MBA-Ivy-Admissions-Consulting-EMBA

Wharton (Penn) – Top 10 MBA

4. University of Chicago (Booth)

The University of Chicago Booth School of Business’ average incoming MBA student had a 724 GMAT score. There is no officially published acceptance rate, but the school currently enrolls 1,220 full-time MBA students.

5. Northwestern University (Kellogg)

The Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University has a 727 average MBA applicant GMAT score, and a 27% acceptance rate.  Kellogg currently enrolls 1,016 full-time MBA students.

Kellogg (Northwestern) – Top 10 MBA

6. Columbia University

Columbia Business School has a 726 GMAT score, an acceptance rate of 16%, and there are currently 1,521 full-time MBA students enrolled at Columbia.
Top Ten MBA Programs

Columbia University – Top 10 MBA

7. New York University (Stern)

NYU Stern School of Business has a 723 average GMAT score, admitted 29% of applicants last year, and currently enrolls 668 full-time MBA students.

NYU Stern – Top 10 MBA

8. MIT – Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Sloan)

MIT’s Sloan School of Management has a 720 average GMAT score, though last year the GMAT + GRE was OPTIONAL!  The school did not disclose its acceptance rate for last year, but it currently enrolls 887 full-time MBA students.

MIT Sloan – Top 10 MBA

9. Yale University

Yale School of Management’s MBA applicants had an average 720 GMAT score, a 29% acceptance rate, and currently has 692 full-time MBA students enrolled.

10. Dartmouth College (Tuck)

Dartmouth College’s Tuck School of Business applicants reported a 720 average GMAT score, a 34% acceptance rate, and the school currently enrolls 575 full-time MBA students.

Need more information, or not sure what school or application round is right for you?  I’m a former Harvard admissions interviewer, and a Harvard grad and currently run the TOP TEN MBA admissions firm: MBAIvy.com

Contact me today for a free consultation, and get into the business school of your dreams! www.MBAIvy.com

Applying for an EMBA instead?  Check out my MBA Admissions Blog for great Executive MBA tips and advice as I specifically work with EMBA candidates, too:

https://mbaivy.com/2017/01/your-emba-strategy-should-you-apply-for-an-executive-mba/

24 08, 2021

Why Bother Getting an MBA?

By |2021-08-24T12:23:13-04:00August 24th, 2021|Harvard, HBS, Ivy League, MBA, MBA Admissions, MBA Essays|0 Comments

Why bother getting an MBA?

If this question is on your mind it’s good to understand the positive impact getting an MBA  from one of the Top 10 bschools would bring to your career and life. An Ivy League MBA can help take you to places in your career that could increase your quality of life both in the office and out! It is good to keep in mind though that it is a large commitment of time and finances to make it happen but the rewards can be amazing! I can help you with the entire process!

One of the obvious reasons professionals choose to pursue an MBA from one of the Top 10 is for career acceleration and change. They have worked in the market for a period of time and realized that to get the leadership positions they want a graduate degree will get them there faster. They also realize that an MBA would help them to transition to another industry giving them greater flexibility to change roles.

In general, attending a top MBA program will also bring new skills to you including interpersonal, leadership, strategic thinking and communication skills. The programs are not just focused hard skills and quantitative analysis, in areas such as operations and finance. The top bschools focus and developing well rounded graduates that are ready to hit the ground running and make a difference in their existing organization after graduating.

MBA students are also hoping to get a ROI in getting their new degree. Sometimes your company may pay for you to return to school with some reasonable payback period! As with most advanced degrees you increase your salary potential with the more knowledge and ability you bring to a company. Not only could your earning potential increase but you may be setting yourself up to start your own business! MBA programs are ideal for connecting with other driven individuals to help establish a solid network post-graduation. These connections can become invaluable throughout your career and life in general.

If you need more guidance and insight please reach out for a free MBA or EMBA consultation. As a former Harvard admissions interviewer and Harvard grad, I specialize in helping clients get into the Top Ten Ivy League MBA and EMBA programs around the world.

The Top 10 include:

  1. Stanford
  2. Wharton
  3. MIT Sloan
  4. Harvard (HBS)
  5. Columbia
  6. Kellogg
  7. NYU Stern

You can contact me for a free consultation at: www.mbaivy.com and let me help you get into a great MBA program and achieve your dream of getting into the Ivy League!

Also, check out my other MBA & EMBA business school admissions blog articles, such as The Top TEN MBA + EMBA Programs for Entrepreneurs for free MBA admission advice!

31 01, 2020

EMBA Deadlines: Should You Apply? The Answer is YES!

By |2020-01-31T22:19:32-05:00January 31st, 2020|Chicago Booth, Columbia, Darden, EMBA, Fuqua, GMAT, Kellogg, LBS, MIT Sloan, NYU Stern, UC Berkeley Haas, UCLA Anderson, Wharton|0 Comments

EMBA’s work on rolling admissions, versus the more concrete deadlines we usually associate with straight MBA programs. However, if you have more than 6 years professional experience in your particular field, the EMBA might just be a better fit for you, and more than help your career.

Furthermore, EMBA programs don’t usually require a GMAT score!  Yes, you heard that correctly and I know it made your day!  A high GMAT could still help you, but it isn’t necessary, and often you can get a waiver, take the EA (Executive Assessment) test instead, or depending on the particular  school selected, not even take any standerized test at all!

EMBA admissions is all about your resume, what you’ve currently done with your career, and where you want to go: your goals and dreams.  Not only that, but really how you want to use your degree to get there.

Are you looking for networking?  Building your knowledge base?  Exploring certain aspects of a parallel field to help you or your company’s growth?  All of those answers are ones the EMBA admissions committee will like, and are good reason for wanting to continue your business education.

All that said, if you’re looking to get in to a top EMBA program, like those offered at Columbia Business School, Wharton, Duke Fuqua, Kellogg (Northwestern), NYU Stern, MIT Sloan, Chicago Booth, UVA Darden, UC Berkeley Haas, UCLA Anderson, Yale + MORE, take a look below!

The 2020 deadlines for the EMBA are stated here, and if you’d like help with your EMBA application and essays, please contact me for a FREE consultation, and I’ll help you determine your best strategy, and if the EMBA is right for you:   www.MBAIvy.com

And, now, without further delay:

EMBA Deadlines, 2020

*NOTE: Many top EMBA programs start admitting candidates for programs that begin in the summer and fall of 2020 NOW, given their policy of rolling admissions.

There is still plenty of time though before final deadlines, and I just recommend that you try to get your applications in earlier than later, as the competition for spots gets tighter and tighter the closer you get towards the end.

202 EMBA DEADLINES:

Wharton EMBA
February 5, 2020

Chicago Booth EMBA
Early: Feb 3, 2020
Final: April 1, 2020

Columbia EMBA, May 2020 Start Date
Early: January 8, 2020
Final: February 19, 2020

Columbia EMBA, August 2020 Start Date
Early: March 18, 2020
Final: May 27, 2020

Columbia EMBA-Global (Dual degree w/ LBS): May 2020 Start Date
Early: January 21, 2020
Late: March 10, 2020

Columbia EMBA-Global Asia (London Business School and University of Hong Kong): May 2020 Start Date
Round 2: January 19, 2020
Round 3: February 23, 2020
Round 4: March 26, 2020

Duke Fuqua Global EMBA
Round 3: Jan. 22, 2020
Round 4: Mar. 11, 2020
Round 5: April 29, 2020
Round 6: May 27, 2020

Duke Fuqua Weekened EMBA
Round 4: Jan. 22, 2020
Round 5: Mar. 11, 2020

Kellogg EMBA: September 2020 Start Date
Round 1: April 22, 2020
Round 2: June 3, 2020

MIT Sloan EMBA
Early Deadline: January 7, 2020
Round 1: March 12, 2020
Round 2: May 28, 2020

NYU Stern EMBA: August Start Date
Early Deadline: March 1, 2020
Final Deadline: May 1, 2020

NYU Stern EMBA Washington, DC: August Start Date
Early Deadline: March 1, 2020
Final Deadline: May 1, 2020

UC Berkeley Haas EMBA
Round 2: February 5, 2020

UCLA Anderson EMBA
Round 2: February 1, 2020
Final Deadline: May 1, 2020

UVA Darden EMBA: August Start Date
January 10, 2020
February 10, 2020
March 10, 2020
April 10, 2020
May 10, 2020
June 10, 2020
June 25, 2020

Yale EMBA
Round 2: January 30, 2020
Round 3: March 30, 2020

[Again, want help with your EMBA application? I’m a former Harvard interviewer and Harvard grad. Check out my website, and contact me for your FREE consultation today! www.MBAIvy.com ]

29 01, 2020

Rejected From HBS or Your Top Ten MBA Program?

By |2022-09-18T13:09:03-04:00January 29th, 2020|EMBA, GMAT, Harvard, HBS, MBA, MBA Admissions, MBA Essays, Rec Letters, resume, Stanford, Wharton|0 Comments

Rejected From HBS or Your “Top Ten” MBA Program?

What should you do now?  Should you even think about reapplying for an MBA next year?

It’s January, and it’s cold in most parts of the country, freezing cold depending where you are, but nothing quite matches the cold sting of rejection you feel, if you got rejected from all of your MBA or EMBA programs this year.

Yup, sadly to say, it happens.

You took the time to apply, you really wanted to get in to a “Top Ten” MBA or EMBA program, your GMAT scores or EA (Executive Assessment) scores were strong, you’ve have a good job, with a prestigious, known-name firm in your field, and your recommenders were more than happy to help you out and write your rec.

So, let’s just say, in terms of gaining admissions to not only the MBA or EMBA business school program of your choice, but ANY MBA or EMBA program…you really don’t know exactly what went wrong.

And, then the next question that comes to mind is, “should I even try to apply again this year?”

That’s where I come in with some strong advice.  I’m a former Harvard admissions interviewer, and a Harvard graduate myself.

I know how this stuff works!  First off, you need some eagle eyes on your actual applications — the ones that DIDN’T get you in to your school.

An experienced MBA admissions counselor will be able to take one look at your application (MBA resume, essays, recommendations, GMAT scores) and in a quick instant give you a run down of where the real problem lies.

Having been working in MBA admissions myself now for over 12 years, I will tell you, that most often rejections happen because of the following, and in this order:

  1. GMAT scores are too low for the MBA program you’re targeting
  2. The Resume: Not enough years of work experience, or work experience at non known-name firms (only relevant in certain fields, like finance…but there VERY relevant).
  3. POORLY WRITTEN MBA ESSAYS.
  4. Number 3 above is so important, I’m going to say that again: POORLY WRITTEN MBA ESSAYS are the #1 reason that almost 95% of people will get turned down from even interviewing at their top MBA or EMBA schools.
  5. Weak recommendations.
  6. Weak Interview (if you even got one, which if you didn’t, is a worse sign (but nothing that can’t be rectified next year, when you reapply!)
  7. Everything you have is “good enough” but there is not one single thing in your application that makes you stand out, or appear more interesting or unique than the person who just applied before you, or the person whose application they will read after, and so then you it simply becomes a random shot in the dark.
As a public service, let me now go through these most common reasons for MBA or EMBA business school admission rejections,  so everything becomes even more clear:

GMAT SCORES: The top business schools like HBS, Stanford, Wharton, and MIT can obviously have their pick of applicants, and the very first thing they look at is your GMAT score.  If you don’t know, or aren’t clear where your score fits on the hierarchy of business school candidates, take a look at my article here: The GMAT Score You Need To Get In To A “Top Ten” MBA!

WORK EXPERIENCE: Aside from what I have already said above, allow me to add that HOW your MBA resume looks is equally important.  The schools, and especially the more conservative (traditional) MBA programs like HBS, Wharton, Chicago Booth, MIT Sloan, NYU Stern, UC Berkeley, etc., do not, under any circumstance, want to see a resume that doesn’t look like the person took the time to make it neat, easy to read, devoid of weird embellishments (like odd fonts – believe me, I’ve seen it), or they somehow make the font so small to cram everything in on one page, that you can’t read anything.  Don’t do that.

So, yes, your actually work experience is important, how many years, etc., but also do pay attention to how a formal MBA resume should look.  For a good article on MBA resumes check out my previous article here: How To Make Your MBA Resume Shine!

Now, on to my most important MBA admissions tip:

Don’t write weak MBA essays.  Don’t know what makes a GREAT MBA essay?  Do your research!  Get help!  Ask other MBA admissions consultants like me (as I offer a FREE consultation here: Click here for your FREE MBA consult!).

Make sure you know what a GOOD MBA essay looks like, or better yet 10 GOOD MBA essays, before you strike out on your own, unaware.  Poorly written, or just plain bad essays that don’t fully address the question, or (in the case of HBS) don’t give the MBA admissions committee anything at all close to what they are looking for…only makes it more likely that you, my friend, will get the big rejection.

And, nobody like that.

Brrrrr, did it just get cold in here?

YOUR RECOMMENDATIONS: Very important, and perhaps more important than you realize, as someone who writes you a “nice” recommendation, is not going to hold water to someone who writes someone else a “the best employee I’ve ever had, he/she saved my life when we had to go to China for a business trip unannounced, sealed the deal singly-handedly, made the presentation, and brought our firm more revenue than we’ve seen in the last 100 years combined” recommendation.

In other words, you really need to make sure you’re choosing the best WRITER possible, when you’re looking to see whom to ask for recs. It makes a difference.

THE MBA INTERVIEW: I’m going to write an entire MBA admissions blog post on this one topic alone, so stay tuned, but basically, if you didn’t get offered an interview, that’s a bad sign, and if you were offered an interview, but it didn’t go well, or you don’t know how it really went, when it comes down to it, because you thought you did “okay enough” — just know that “okay enough” isn’t really okay, and that’s something I offer too, in terms of MBA or EMBA interview prep, so 1). You actually GET the business school interview in the first place, and 2). You don’t blow it when you do.

The interviews are extremely important.  On campus interviews are actually even more advantageous than alumni interviews (unless you are overseas), but this is something I will speak more about in my MBA interview blog post.

INDIVIDUALITY: Lastly, you really need to have something in your MBA application that makes you STAND OUT.

This can be anything — it can be a project you worked on, a perfect GMAT score, a humanitarian organization you founded, a business you run on the side, an interesting trip you took, or sport you participate in.  Basically, ANYTHING that makes the adcom (i.e. MBA admissions committee) say, “Oh yeah, I know who you’re talking about, I read that application too.”

Be memorable, stand out, have something, anything, that makes you just a little, itty bit “unique” and you’ll be way ahead of the business school admissions game.

And, remember, if the reason you didn’t get in was, in fact, one of the above, the best thing you can do for yourself is get a second pair of eagle eyes on your rejected MBA application, and have someone like myself give you an overview and an analysis  — because most problems are fixable, and with the right MBA admissions coach and help, you absolutely should fix the problems, get more work experience under your belt, raise your GMAT scores by taking classes or buying books, and apply again.

Each year I work with applicants who are actually reapplicants, and I get them in to HBS, Wharton, and Stanford.

There is no reason, with the right help, this can’t be you.

[I’m a former Harvard admissions interviewer and Harvard grad, and currently run the top MBA & EMBA admissions consulting firm: www.MBAIvy.com  Contact me today, and get into the bschool of your dreams!]

For other great MBA admissions tips and advice, you can read through my other blog posts here:

1 12, 2019

How To Get In to a Top Ten MBA Program

By |2022-09-18T12:47:38-04:00December 1st, 2019|Columbia, Darden, Dartmouth Tuck, EMBA, Fuqua, GMAT, Harvard, HBS, Ivy League, Kellogg, MBA, MBA Admissions, MBA Essays, MIT Sloan, NYU Stern, Ross, Stanford, UC Berkeley Haas, UCLA Anderson, Wharton|0 Comments

How to Get In to a Top Ten MBA Program: What You Need to Know…

Applying to a Top Ten MBA program this year?

The ability to be concise is a gift. It’s also one of the business skills MBA admissions committees look for in an applicant. Not just at Harvard and Stanford, mind you, but at any of the Top Ten highly competitive business schools.

What MBA and EMBA program admissions committees look for is this:

  1. Can you convey your assets and talents in a clear, crisp, concise professional way, and
  2. Can you be consistent?

The real question is, can you get your message across in a moderate amount of words? That means, under or near, but not over the maximum.  Can you do it in a way that’s succinct, and yet shows the MBA committee who you are as a future successful business leader and innovator? Can you do this in a way that will make you stand out?

In other words, are you up for the challenge?  If so, than allow me to relate the following as an example:

This year’s Harvard MBA essay question is:  “As we review your application, what more would you like us to know as we consider your candidacy for the Harvard Business School MBA Program? (no word limit).”

Most of the applicants who are successful in getting in to HBS have, on average, essays that come in with a word count of 1,000 words. Not 1,500 words, and not 2,000 words or more.

In other words, listen to me: write a manifesto, and it will get you dinged!

The goal, especially at an Ivy League or “Top Ten” business school, is to present who you are, personally and professionally in the strongest way possible.

That means:

1. Know what you want to do. “Undecided” as a career move is weak. The schools (and the business world) doesn’t like weak.

2. Know how your current background and expertise fits in with what that particular school can UNIQUELY offer. In other words, know what makes that school DIFFERENT

3. Know what you, yourself, intend to give back to the school. The adcom wants to know what you bring to table, not only for your fellow classmates, but what you see in yourself, right now, that will set you apart, and indicate that you already have the potential to succeed in the future.

Successful MBA essays usually revolve around a candidate’s unique vision, background, and passion

Drive is also an important trait. All that said, you don’t need to have conquered the world (yet) to get into HBS or a comparable school like Kellogg, Chicago Booth, Wharton or MIT Sloan. You just need to show the admissions committee that you have the intense drive and vision to succeed, at whatever it is you uniquely are setting out to do.

A focused VISION, and a logical, thought out road map in terms of how you’re going to get there, makes you different and stands out.

Top Ten students, as a whole, are competitive, ambitious, driven, and interesting…and, they care about their fellow students and community.

Harvard, for example, values leadership, and those who have the demonstrated potential in their background to become leaders in the future succeed. However, equally important, are those who can demonstrate that they care about their community. In other words, you need to show that your drive isn’t all about YOU.

MBA and EMBA “Top Ten” business school candidates who can show a larger, global, or even (especially for HBS, in particular) social humanitarian interest, and zone in what they do, or want to do with an actionable plan — have, throughout the years that I personally have been working with clients, have had the best possible outcome of success.

The MBA admissions essay therefore  is your place to shine, so don’t hold back.  Top Ten business school adcoms don’t just want to see a reiteration of your resume though. Your resume is an outline, the plate your application sits on. The foundation, but the MBA admissions essays, if you think of them this way, becomes the meat or centerpiece of your meal.

[Looking for help on your MBA or EMBA applications? I’m a former Harvard interviewer, and Harvard grad and run the award-winning MBA & EMBA admission firm: MBA Ivy League Contact me today for a free consultation, and get into the school of your dreams!]

Check out my other related MBA blog articles here: The Harvard 2+2 Program: Is it Right For You?

30 05, 2017

MBA Application Deadlines for 2017-2018

By |2019-01-03T17:04:14-05:00May 30th, 2017|Columbia, Dartmouth Tuck, Harvard, HBS, INSEAD, MBA, MBA Admissions, MBA Essays, NYU Stern, Ross, Wharton|0 Comments

The top MBA business school deadlines for the 2017-2018 admissions cycle are starting to come in!

I will be updating the MBA IVY blog as Round 1 dates and essay questions continue to be announced, but for now, the big changes from last year include Harvard (HBS) moving their deadline up to Sept 6 (R1) and Jan 3 (R2) respectively, and Wharton now more aligned with other “Top Ten” MBA programs, with a Sept 19th deadline for Round 1.

As mentioned, essay questions for some of the MBA programs have also already been announced, so while we still wait for others, check the list out below and check back soon!

And remember, if you need extra help or advice on this year’s application:

I’m a former Harvard admissions interviewer and a Harvard grad, and run the top MBA admission consulting firm www.MBAIVY.com  Contact me today and get into the school of your dreams!]

17 04, 2017

Stand Out From The Pack: Making Your MBA Application Even More Competitive

By |2019-01-03T17:06:48-05:00April 17th, 2017|MBA Admissions|0 Comments

Business schools like leaders. High GMAT scores are great, pedigree experience at well known-name firms will get you attention, but business schools…especially if you’re looking at the famed  ‘Top Ten’ and targeting places like HBS, Wharton, Kellogg or Chicago Booth for your MBA or EMBA degree, want to see that you also bring something actively interesting to the table.

What do I mean by “actively interesting?”  Something that demonstrates you are ambitious, innovative and using every ounce of your time to creatively push your career forward.

The best way to do this?  In my opinion, it’s to start your own side business, and/or not-for-profit organization.

It doesn’t matter how big it is, it doesn’t matter how successful.  What matters is that you ACTIVELY decided to take a step forward and tried something perhaps outside your comfort zone. Even while working a full-time job.

For example:

  1. I worked with an applicant who started a humanitarian organization raising just a mere $1,000 USD initially to buy school supplies for girls in India. This non-profit is now bringing in over $250k annually, and its founder, who really didn’t have much truly outstanding on her resume to begin with that would get her noticed, got into HBS, Stanford, and MIT.  She thought of an idea, built a website, enacted a marketing plan using nothing but social media, and MADE A DIFFERENCE in other people’s lives and her own.  All while working a “regular” job. This shows leadership, and is exactly what the top MBA programs want to see.

This strategy of building your own side project or business, and just putting it out there, also works particular well for those MBA business school applicants who might be straddling the fence in terms of not quite breaking a 720 on the GMAT, or not quite having “known name” firms on your resume, or not having enough years of what the MBA committee would deem “significant” industry experience…in other words, your MBA application could use a little boost to the next level.

Time and time again, I’ve had clients who decided to push forward by starting something new — however small it might be!  It doesn’t need to be this great big thing.  Really.  They put it on the web, took the necessary steps to market their new idea, maybe wrote a business plan, and regardless of profitability…did you read that?  If not, read it again to make sure you really get it… regardless of profitability, they demonstrated to admissions that they were willing to stretch, to take a risk with their time outside of work, to be ambitions, to try out their ideas even if they failed, because even failing could lead to the next great idea, and no experience in terms of MBA admissions is ever really wasted.

So, build a website, no matter how simple.  Think of an idea. Profit or non-profit. Create a landing page, or create something larger. Start something, anything, work on it, improve it as you go along, and just get it out there.  This will give you something else to talk about in terms of your business experience in your essays and in your MBA admissions interview. It will add color and interest to your entire MBA or EMBA application. It will make you more original, and original leaders are who the top schools want.

So far, the best site I’ve seen in terms of tech support and  minimum investment is: BLUEHOST:


For only $5.95 a month (and sometimes they have monthly specials that bring the cost down even lower) the company will host your site, and more importantly, provide tech support in helping you get your site up and running.

So, no matter if you choose to go the humanitarian route with a non-profit, or if your idea is a money making business that could be the next big thing, adding something “extra” and on-the-side to your MBA & EMBA business school application can make all the difference between an MBA admissions committee seeing you as just an average so-so applicant who doesn’t really stand out from the pack, to someone who has initiative, takes charge of their own future by actively DOING, and wants to make things happen.

So, want to get in to HBS, Wharton, Booth, Kellogg, or MIT Sloan this year?  THIS is the type applicant you need to be.

[I’m a former Harvard admissions interviewer and a Harvard grad, and currently run the MBA & EMBA admissions consulting firm MBA IVY.  My firm specializes in helping students get in to the Top Ten business schools. Contact us today at www.MBAIvy.com and get into the school of your dreams!]

27 01, 2017

Your EMBA Strategy: Should You Apply for an Executive MBA?

By |2019-01-03T17:07:25-05:00January 27th, 2017|Chicago Booth, Columbia, Darden, Dartmouth Tuck, EMBA, Fuqua, GMAT, GRE, Harvard, HBS, INSEAD, Kellogg, MBA, MBA Admissions, MBA Essays, MIT Sloan, NYU Stern, Ross, Stanford, UC Berkeley Haas, UCLA Anderson, Uncategorized, Wharton|1 Comment

The Executive MBA (or, as it’s more commonly know, EMBA) is for those professionals applying to business school who already have more than a few years experience under your belt.  You’ve graduated from good college, you have a strong job, and you’ve been working in your career now, on average 8-10+ years.

You’ve also probably reached a level in your specific industry where you know you want more out of your career.  Or, perhaps you simply want to go in a completely new direction, and you know you need to first reinforce your skill-set, knowledge base, contacts and networking in order to get you to the next credentialed level.

This is exactly what the EMBA was designed for: people like you who have already achieved a level of professional success: whether that’s on the corporate side, in entrepreneurship, the finance industry, energy industry, or whatever your cup of tea is.  You simply know you now want to take your career someplace even more interesting.

There are a few thing you need to know first though, about applying to this type of executive business school program, in order to make sure you first have all your ducks in a row:

  • EMBA programs usually work on rolling admissions.  That means research your schools early, and know their deadlines.  Then, map out a game plan that gets your applications in earlier rather than later, as spots in EMBA programs (versus the regular MBA) start to fill up (and thereby get more competitive) as the deadline nears.
  • You may not need a GMAT or GRE score!  This is great news to some, and at times the #1 reason for applying for the EMBA over the regular, full-time MBA.  Each school is different though, and some programs (like Wharton) still require it, so as with the above point, do your research on your schools and check early.
  • EMBA programs are usually almost always part-time.  This is usually a plus for busy, successful professionals who fully intend to keep working full-time while they attend school — and for most people who are at the EMBA level, that’s a work week that’s already pretty darn full, so this is good news.
  • The EMBA program is slightly easier to get into than the full-time MBA.  Not really true.  You have to be qualified, and of course, it will depend on the school.  Wharton’s EMBA program, in my opinion, (and I have been working as a top MBA & EMBA admissions consultant now for a very long time), is that it is just as difficult to get into as their regular, full-time MBA program, and is one of the most competitive EMBA programs around.  Not to discourage anyone, but if you are going to apply, just make sure you don’t skimp on anything: your resume, the essays, your interview.  You simply always want to put forth your absolutely best.
  • They’re not going to care about your undergraduate grades. Probably true!  Of course everything always matters and counts when admissions is evaluating your overall profile, and you want to make sure you’re as competitive as possible, in every given area, to give yourself the best chance, but that “C” you got 10 years ago now in Chemistry or Advanced Calculus while you were an undergrad…not going to make much of a difference!
  • The EMBA is all about now:  what are you doing in your career now?  Today? What does your resume look like? How many people do you manage?  Do you have any direct reports?  What level of responsibility do you have within your department, or perhaps this is your own company! How do your application essays, your interview, your profile, and your resume add up?  And what about your rec letters?  Do people speak highly of you, and do you present yourself as a natural innovator and leader? These are the things that will get you in!

The Executive EMBA is all about helping today’s business leaders and visionaries move higher by giving them the tools and relationships they need, and some of the best schools out there for today’s top EMBA include: Wharton, Columbia, MIT Sloan, NYU Stern, Chicago Booth, and Kellogg on top of many more.

Thinking about applying for your EMBA and want more information?  Feel free to contact me before for an initial consultation. Current EMBA deadlines for Fall 2017 matriculation are coming up, depending on your school, but there is still ample time to apply! Happy to take your calls:

[I’m a former Harvard admissions interviewer and a Harvard grad, and currently run the MBA & EMBA admissions firm: MBA Ivy. Contact me today for a free consultation and get into the business school of your dreams: www.MBAIvy.com / MBAIvyLeagueInfo@gmail.com / (646) 276-7042 ]

11 08, 2016

The 10 Best MBA Business School Programs for Entrepreneurs

By |2022-09-21T19:50:08-04:00August 11th, 2016|Babson, Darden, Dartmouth Tuck, IE, IE Business School, IESE Business School, LBS, MBA, MBA Admissions, Stanford, UC Berkeley Haas, UCLA Anderson, Wharton|0 Comments

MBA business school admissions is up this year, and one of the strongest MBA & EMBA admission categories is for those interested in becoming successful entrepreneurs.

Most entrepreneurs and business owners know it takes more than just a good idea to build a strong company.  Success is built on networking, forming strong business connections, knowing how to raise capital, as well as how to properly plan, research, brand, and strategize your company and product, and only THEN launch your business…all while protecting your idea.

And what better place to do this than within a top MBA or EMBA business school where you will be able to access all the support you need for both a successful launch AND future growth!

Staying ahead of the game is what gives you an advantage, and what some of the most successful business leaders, MBA students  and entrepreneurs already know is that the elite innovation labs at some of the best MBA business school programs in the country (and around the world) can certainly give you and your new business a great start in the process of becoming successful.

These MBA programs WORK, and they work because they strive to give you the exact tools and advisory support you need to put your idea out there and succeed.

As one of the top MBA admissions consultants in the U.S., let me advise you that there is nothing better than taking the opportunity to learn from the best.   This means not just from the other entrepreneurs who are your classmates, but from your professors and industry lecturers as well who are often the top leaders and experts in their field.

So, if you’re looking for the best MBA business school programs for entrepreneurship look no further, as they are as follows:

  1. Stanford Graduate School of Business
  2. Babson College’s Olin Graduate School of Business
  3. University of Virginia Darden School of Business
  4. Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business
  5. UCLA Anderson School of Management
  6. UC Berkeley Haas School of Business
  7. University of Pennsylvania Wharton School
  8. IE Business School
  9. London Business School
  10. IESE Business School

Taken from the Financial Times ranking of the Top 25 Business School MBA Programs for entrepreneurship, these MBA business schools can really put you ahead of the crowd.

More importantly though, they teach you how to get that very same crowd behind you and your company by teaching you how to develop the skills you need to launch and sustain your business well into the future!

Looking for MBA or EMBA admissions consulting?  MBA IVY is run by a Harvard graduate as well as a former Harvard admissions interviewer. Contact us for a free profile evaluation today and get into the bschool of your dreams! MBAIvy.com * (646) 276-7042 * MBAIvyLeagueInfo@gmail.com 

19 06, 2016

The GMAT Score You Need For A Top Ten MBA

By |2022-09-18T12:56:36-04:00June 19th, 2016|EMBA, GMAT, MBA Admissions, Wharton|2 Comments

The GMAT score you need to get into a “Top Ten”

Are your GMAT scores good enough to get you in to a Top Ten MBA business school?

How about if you’re interested in getting your EMBA? Are GMAT scores necessary? Do you even know what the average GMAT score for your target school IS?

You should.

That is what everyone wants to know, after all: is my GMAT even competitive for the programs I’m targeting?  What if I’m targeting Stanford, MIT, or Harvard and the Ivy League?  

Can I even get in?

Obviously, the higher your GMAT or GRE score the better chance you have of gaining admission to a strong MBA or EMBA program.

Additionally, crossing over that 720 GMAT line truly does put you in a different category with MBA business school ad com around the world.

My experience? The highest score of any client I personally worked with as an MBA admissions consultant was 780.  The applicant, a young man in his mid-twenties from NYC, didn’t have much in terms of professional experience.  In fact, due to downsizing at his company after the pandemic, he was forced to take a job just to survive, in an entirely unrelated career!  He had been in finance and now he was in lower-level tech.

In other words, though very smart, the applicant’s resume was a mess.

BUT…he took the GMAT and got a 780.  With that alone, regardless of his professional experience, regardless of a career that seemed pretty disjointed and fragmented, and not too stable right from the start, our 26-year-old applicant in question got in to all 3 of his target schools:

Columbia, Kellogg, and Booth.

My point?  A high score can mean an awful lot.

So, what are the average GMAT scores of the Top Ten MBA programs in the U.S.?

This great chart put together by the website Poets & Quant shows the average GMAT’s from the most competitive business schools around, including HBS, Stanford, Booth, Wharton, Kellogg, Columbia, MIT Sloan, Berkeley Haas.

Remember though, these are GMAT averages.  That means there were GMAT scores both above and below what you see here.  This means people got in with higher scores than this, and people got in with lower GMAT scores than the ones here.

Not hitting this exact score in other words doesn’t mean you can’t get in.

So, take a look below and see how your own GMAT scores compares!  Do you make it on the list?

GMAT MBA Top Ten

In terms of the non-U.S. schools, I did the following research, and came up with these, again average, GMAT’s for the top non-U.S. schools:

  • INSEAD    704
  • LBS    700
  • Cambridge (Judge)  690
  • Oxford (Said)  690

Slightly lower than the U.S. schools, but still breaking 680 (in averages).

So, what does all this mean?  Overall, if you want to go to a highly competitive MBA program, you want to be hitting around 680+ on your practice tests and the higher the score the better, so studying and preparing truly helps and there are a lot of good online GMAT courses and books out there.

So, do your best, take the test, and get the GMAT score of your dreams!

Check out my other blog articles on MBA admissions, like this one here: https://mbaivy.com/2021/09/01/tips-to-writing-a-better-mba-admissions-resume/

[I’m a former Harvard interviewer and a Harvard grad and currently run the MBA & EMBA admissions consulting firm www.MBAIvy.com. Contact me for a free consultation today and get into the business school of your dreams! ]

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